Fair treatment of employees is a cornerstone for improving productivity

Improving productivity is a concern for all businesses but it is harder to achieve if employees do not believe they are receiving fair treatment.

As I have said in many previous blogs, a motivated workforce is more likely to go the extra mile if they feel valued as people, this means managers treating them with respect, listening to them, showing consideration to them, recognising their contribution, rewarding their contribution and protecting them from inappropriate behaviour by others at work. In summary treating them with respect and showing them that their effort is valued.

Recognition can simply be saying “thank you” for a job well done, it is not just about money.

However, money can become an issue when there is a clear disparity in pay. While discrimination is illegal and applies to any disparity of remuneration on grounds of gender, race, religion or ethnicity, this is not about legislating for staff motivation.

To be motivated staff need to feel they are treated...

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Diversity of thought is about more than challenging stereotypes and ticking a box

Too often the word diversity as applied to directors of companies is seen as demonstrating representation by gender, ethnicity, religion, and possibly of age. But it should actually be about more than that, it should also be about diversity of thought and ideas.

The challenges facing businesses in the 21st Century are becoming more complex and happening at a faster pace so it makes sense to have people at board level who think differently and can communicate their ideas.

In a recent survey carried out by Social Mobility Pledge as reported by The Times newspaper, the researchers found that by and large “who you know” was still the most important factor when promoting staff.

Sadly, the inference from this is that recruitment tends to favour like-minded people, which is hardly helpful to businesses wanting to avoid being stuck in a rut.

The ability to challenge the status quo at all levels and in particular a board level was a topic discussed in a recent vimeo by Kenneth...

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What kinds of jobs will be taken over by automation?

In late March, the ONS (Office for National Statistics) published its latest findings on the effects of automation on the jobs market.

It found that some 1.5 million jobs were at high risk from automation, but, tellingly, 70% of these roles were currently held by women. The next most at risk groups were part timers and young people.

The ONS calculates that around 710,000 jobs in the City may be taken over by automated technology, with around 39% of jobs in the accounting, legal and financial services sectors most likely to be automated and that 34% of roles in tax advice could be affected..

Waiters and waitresses, shelf fillers and elementary sales occupations, are most likely to go, all roles defined as low-skilled or routine. Increasing numbers of factory workers are also at risk of being replaced by machines.

Least endangered are medical practitioners, higher education teaching professionals, and senior professionals in education although many of their support functions such...

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Flexible working can foster innovation and creativity

A set of annual awards launched seven years ago is demonstrating the positive benefits of allowing employees to work flexible and part time hours.

The Timewise Power Awards winners for 2019 have just been announced and, as the founders say, they demonstrate the art of the possible.

Among them is Srin Madipalli, a wheelchair user who works 85% full time for AirBnB and combines this with public speaking to raise disability and accessibility issues at forums including the United Nations, Rio Paralympics and the Tech Inclusion Summit.

Chris Bryant, a partner at Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner, works three days a week helping clients from all sectors to prepare for Brexit, and at the same time cares for his daughter and writes for musical theatre. His work has been performed at the Edinburgh Festival and is now being developed for a nationwide tour.

Amy Haworth, a director working on an 80% contract for Deloitte, combines her working life with 60 to 80 performances a year as an international...

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Skills shortages and recruitment problems for SMEs amid ongoing Brexit uncertainty

I try to avoid the dreaded “B” word in my blogs but on this occasion, I can’t avoid it as the chorus of business voices highlighting skills shortages and recruitment problems grows larger and louder.

It is no good for Government to assert that it will all be fine once negotiations on the UK’s leaving the EU are concluded when the situation is no clearer now than it was when all this started almost two years ago.

Somehow, businesses need to carry on in the interim as well as planning for the future.  Some things just cannot wait and high on the list is where and how they are going to source the people they need at all skill levels, whether or not they trade abroad.

Some facts about skills shortages and recruitment problems

Firstly, the most recent complete set of immigration figures, published by the ONS (Office for National Statistics) showed that, in 2017, more EU citizens, 139,000, left the UK than came here to work, 101,000. This was the lowest level...

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The pros and cons of team building activities for SMEs

There is considerable disagreement about the effectiveness of company team building activities, especially those that involve away-days for things like paintballing, go-karting, white water rafting and the like.

The question is whether team building activities away from the office will make a noticeable difference to your productivity, rather than simply to the bottom line of the businesses that offer such facilities.

According to Forbes Magazine, Kate Mercer, author of A Buzz in the Building: How to Build and Lead a Brilliant Organisation and a co-founder of the Leaders Lab consultancy, warns that such activities can actually damage your workplace because it takes a great deal of skill to bring out the learning points and to transfer them back to the workplace.

Not only that, she says, they can make some employees feel embarrassed and others feel patronised and too often they confuse socialising with actual team building activities.

Such exercises can also be expensive,...

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